Stay tuned:Internet of Everything challenge for developers & companies opening soon

Cities of Antwerpen, Copenhagen and Helsinki will open an innovation challenge for the European companies: how can the cities reinvent themselves as linked and large-scale Internet of Everything labs, which are open, standardized, data-driven, service-oriented and user-centric, and provide an easy access to developers and innovators to pilot, test and validate their solutions?
The project is called Select for CitiesThe challenge competition of 5,6 M€ which will be divided into 3  stages, between December 2015 and November 2018. It will be organised by using the Pre-commercial procurement (PCP) method.
The consortium is built around three renowned Smart Cities: Antwerp, Copenhagen, Helsinki, and comprises a balanced combination of six multidisciplinary partners across four European countries: Belgium, Denmark, Finland and the UK. These are Forum Virium Helsinki (the project coordinator), Digipolis, iMinds, Københavns Kommune, Stad Antwerpen, and 21C Consultancy Limited (partners in alphabetical order).
Stay tuned for the information sessions and market consultations starting soon across Europe. The first open call for the challenge will kick off early next autumn.
cph

OASC in Barcelona

OASC

Meet the new OASC cities from England, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and take part in the many interactive sessions to learn about the city-driven initiative to create a global smart city market based on simple, open standards at the Smart City Expo. Besides new countries, OASC also welcomes new cities to previous national networks. All cities have signed the OASC Letter of Intent to drive global smart city development based on city needs by implementing three simple standard mechanisms. Third wave brings the total of OASC cities above 70 cities, representing 15 country networks worldwide.

UK hosts launch event

The launch event takes place on November 18, 09.00–09.50 am, at the UK pavilion at the Smart City Expo, Gran Via, hosted by the Future Cities Catapult.

The launch panel speakers will include representatives of the Future Cities Catapult, OASC leadership, the European Commission and cities joining in the 3rd wave. After some introductory remarks, the floor will be open for an interactive Q&A session with the audience.

Apart from the launch, there are many opportunities to meet and engage with the OASC community and leadership. Below is a list of key sessions during the Smart City Expo. You can also meet representatives from OASC cities in many of the other panels.

Looking ahead: Conference, Strategy Forum

The focus of the OASC Task Force is to support the needs of the cities who are already working with the OASC mechanisms, and to inform those who are looking to assess the added value of joining the initiative.

In concrete terms, the Task Force prioritises network support through events and online resources, and technical development through working groups. The network support is targeting topics like technical issues and financing strategies.

The next big OASC event is the Connected Smart Cities Conference on January 21, 2016, in Brussels. Here, the OASC community convenes for a full day of inspiration, learning and networking at an event which is produced in partnership with key stakeholders in the global and European smart cities landscape.

The conference is scheduled back-to-back with the EUROCITIES Knowledge Society Forum and other events, essentially creating a “European smart city week”, so save the week of January 18–22, 2016.

Open & Agile Smart Cities – Smart City Expo World Congress

Tuesday, November 17

11.45–13.00: Juanjo Hierro, OASC Task Force – TE 41 Innovative platforms for multi- stakeholder processes to foster sustainable cities (Room 4).

Wednesday, November 18

09.00–09.50: OASC 3rd Wave Launch – UK Pavilion (Expo Area).
11.30–12.45: Martin Brynskov, OASC Chair – SO 63 Raising resources and creating platforms to develop more equitable cities (Room 6).

Thursday, November 19

11.30–12.45: Jarmo Eskelinen & Catherine Mulligan, OASC Task Force – GO 36 City standards and indicators spreading smart cities (Room 3).

Cities from seven countries boost 
open standards for smart cities

Thirty-one cities from seven countries in Europe and Latin America launch the 
“Open & Agile Smart Cities” initiative to accelerate adoption of 
common standards and principles for global smart city development.

CeBIT was the natural place for one of the most important announcements this year about smart city development in Europe. The Open & Agile Smart Cities (OASC) initiative, signed by 31 cities from Finland, Denmark, Belgium, Portugal, Italy, Spain and Brazil, aims to kickstart the use of a shared set of wide-spread, open standards and principles, enabling the development of smart city applications and solutions to reach many cities at once, by making systems interoperable between cities, and within a city.
As I told in the press conference: “Seen from a developer’s perspective, one city alone is not a market large enough. A number of cities in several countries or a continent, adopting a minimal set of de facto standards is a sizable market on which developers can start investing.”
Picture: Juanjo Hierro, Martin Brynskov (network chair), and me (vice chair).
The OASC Task Force  operates under the Connected Smart Cities (CSC) Network. The first national city networks to join the initiative are Helsinki, Espoo, Vantaa, Tampere, Oulu and Turku in Finland; Copenhagen, Aarhus and Aalborg in Denmark; Brussels, Ghent and Antwerp in Belgium; Porto, Lisbon, Fundão, Palmela, Penela and Águeda in Portugal; Milan, Palermo and Lecce in Italy; Valencia, Santander, Málaga and Sevilla in Spain; and Olinda (Recife), Anapólis (Goiás), Porto Alegre (Rio Grande do Sul), Vitória (Espírito Santo), Colinas de Tocantins (Tocantins) and Taquaritinga (São Paulo) in Brazil.
Cities commit to four things: first, to drive development by implementation, ie. taking concrete action and experimenting. Second, to support open APIs (Application Programming Interface) to services, such as FIWARE NGSI (lightweight means to gather, publish, query and subscribe context-based, real-time information). Third, to use and improve standard data models based on experimentation and actual usage, with data models coming from the work lead by Forum Virium Helsinki for the CitySDK (City Service Development Kit) project. And lastly, cities in the OASC Task Force will publish their open data in compatible open platforms, such as CKAN (Open Knowledge Foundation’s platform).
Commitment to adopt these common standards and principles is supported by the signature of a “Letter of Intent” by cities that become part of the initiative, several of which were present at CeBIT.
The announcement was the first wave in an ongoing series where national networks of cities join the Open & Agile Smart Cities initiative. The process is open to every city in the world which implements the mechanisms, as long as they join up at least two cities from a nation or territory.
The next wave is expected in early summer. Cities from the Netherlands, United Kingdom and Mexico are already on track.
This is a unique opportunity to develop de facto standards in an open and collaborative manner which complements the traditional standards development processes, and focuses on the needs of cities as a whole, including opportunities for local job creation and SME involvement.

Loose coupling – the future of work

Just heard Esko Kilpi speaking about the future of work, and totally bought his vision.
To put it shortly: the jobs of the future is not any longer hierarchy-organised or process-organised, put network-organised. The model is the same as the Internet; things are done in loosely coupled processes.
Basically it is an idea expanded from the loosely coupled ICT, and the benefits are similar but wider:
(Source – Forrester Research, “Software Innovation Requires A Loosely-Coupled Application Architecture”)
Loose architectural coupling unleashes innovation – With not having to reinvent the wheel every time you start a new project, your team is more focused on developing innovations and relying on this architecture knowing that it will work as expected. Also, since this enables agility, faster time-to-market is possible and thereby encouraging bringing new innovations to the market.
Loose architectural coupling protects application investments. With business landscape constantly changing either due to M&A or just aggressive growth, it is pertinent for IT to evolve with newer IT systems but also remaining cautious about not breaking the system when retiring an old system or replacing it with a new system (especially relevant for the public sector!). Loosely coupled architectures make this process seamless.
Loose architectural coupling is a design discipline, not a technology. This is not a technology feature that any vendor can tout. This is only a design discipline that can be enabled with a mature ESB. Whether you leverage the publish-subscribe methodologies within the product or use SOA/APIs to construct such loose coupling, it is up to your architects to decide. But, ensure that you are working towards this model, if you already don’t have it.

Please let me slap you, said the right hand to the left

gym

Silo bureaucracy is a fantastic thing, if you’re interested in the absurdities of life.

Bureaucracy is often faceless, but in reality it is often very personal. There’s often a single person behind the decisions. Park those somebodies as neighbors in government organisations which don’t communicate, and you’ll get great kafkaesque results.

Case example: employer-sponsored smart cards for exercise, for example Ticket Mind & Body which we have.

The point of that benefit is to make us exercise more. Bad physical condition is very expensive to the society, especially in an aging society like ours. Diabetes, heart disease and asthma spread at at an alarming speed. Workout is the best cure for all of these.

We tend to be lazy and come up with excuses of not to exercise. Smart cards takes on of those away by making it easy to join access the services. You can enter the gym or join the workout session just by pushing in a PIN code. You can have self-service gyms, 24 hour gyms; access could be with the exercise card. No need for separate cards or keys.

Except not. Technology does allow this, but the Finnish taxman does not. About a year ago, somebody in the taxman’s office woke up to the possibility of wrongdoing: you could give your smart card to your spouse, who could get the benefit instead of you – and that’s wrong.

So, nowadays smart cards can’t be used with a PIN (which they are made for), but with printed receipts which you need to sign. The gyms need to have service people behind the counter at all times (unless they give you a separate access card), and we can’t use the smart features of the card.

From the national health point of view, wouldn’t it be better that at least someone used the card for exercise? Wouldn’t it make sense to make that as easy as possible?

But hey, that’t not in the areas of responsibility of the taxman…

Open Living Lab Days coming up!!!

OLL

Hope you had a great summer. We Finns have our holiday one month earlier than the rest of Europe, so we are already back to work. July was nice, but it’s good to be back. There’s only so many Finnish river crabs one can catch (in this case, 120) before wanting a change.

For those seeking new ideas & connection, come to the fourth annual Living Labs Summer School, renamed to Open Living Lab Days (because the program spans beyond normal “summer school” boundaries) to Amsterdam. Fantastic program, also this year.

The venue is the beautiful De Nieuve Liefde.  Register in time to make sure there’s space for you! See you in Amsterdam.